Mayor of Wexford Cllr Frank Staples speaks out about mental health in light of suicide figures – Wexford People, November 19 2016

Mayor of Wexford Cllr Frank Staples says that speaking out about his mental illness was like ‘taking away a mask’ and is encouraging people to open up.

Cllr Staples, who has been open about his own battle with depression in recent years, said that suffering in silence is like wearing a mask – an ordeal that it can become very exhausting for a person over time.

‘It’s so exhausting to be covering up mental illness day in and day out,’ he said. ‘When you talk about it, it can only be described as taking away a mask. You feel instantly better. I encourage people to let down the mask and talk about it.’

‘For me as mayor to speak out about my own battle with depression, it has made a huge difference to me,’ he continued. ‘It feels really good to be open. I know now that if I’m not feeling well, I can talk about it. I don’t feel like I am making excuses.’

Cllr Staples acknowledged that it can be difficult for people to seek help themselves when they are suffering from a mental illness. With this in mind, he said it is important for everyone in the community to play their part in tackling the issue.

‘I have said before that I feel that anyone with a mental illness is strong. They have to face daily battles but they can’t keep fighting forever,’ he said.

‘We expect people to ask for help when they are struggling but not everyone is able to do that. We all have a huge part to play. It’s important to ask those close to you how they are and even though they might not speak out the first time, it might encourage them to eventually open up,’ he said.

At a higher level, Cllr Staples said that establishing a 24/7 mental health unit in Wexford is vital, not only for those suffering from mental illness, but for those close to them.

‘If somebody is suffering from depression for example, it’s good for their family to know that there is 24/7 support available. It gives them reassurance that there is somewhere that they can go if their loved one is in difficulty,’ he said. ‘Mental illness doesn’t only affect those suffering.’

Cllr Staples reiterated earlier reports that the County Council are currently in talks with the government on the possibility of an alternative use for St Senan’s Hospital. He said He would like to see a 24/ 7 unit on the grounds of Wexford General Hospital.

‘A 24/7 unit is definitely needed in Wexford and I don’t think anyone is going to argue that. There has been a lot of speculation about where it should be but I would like to see it on the grounds of Wexford General Hospital as you have access to other services there,’ he said.

‘I would love to see it soon but I am under no illusions; it takes a lot of time and money. Finding a building is no problem but hiring staff costs a lot of money,’ he continued. ‘But if we don’t at least talk about it, it will never happen.’

Improving education on mental health is also necessary, according to Cllr Staples, who said that many young people may not know if they are suffering with depression.

‘More could be done for teens and young people. They might be suffering from depression but don’t know the symptoms. There are so many symptoms of depression. They could be going around feeling terrible and not knowing why,’ he said.

Cllr Staples made his comments following the release of figures from the CSO, which showed that 405 people lost their lives to suicide in Wexford between 1995 and 2015. Commenting on the figures, he said that they were shocking and very high but said it is likely that they are even higher in reality. He said it is difficult to know for sure why Wexford has one of the highest rates of suicide in the country.

‘We have a high rate of unemployment and I am sure that isn’t helping,’ he said. ‘But that’s just speculation. I imagine it is linked in some way or another as unemployment puts more financial pressure on people.’

(First published in the Wexford People newspaper: print edition. Also available online at: http://www.independent.ie/regionals/newrossstandard/news/mayor-of-wexford-cllr-frank-staples-speaks-out-about-mental-health-in-light-of-suicide-figures-35215238.html)

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Wicklow residents recall the day a film crew met their fate – Wicklow People, September 17 2016

A moment of movie magic turned to disaster in August 1970 when four people were killed in a plane crash during the filming of World War I film ‘Zeppelin’ off Wicklow Head.

During a scene involving a plane and an Alouette II camera helicopter, the two aircraft collided, resulting in the loss of the lives of the director, camera man and two pilots.

Vincent O’Reilly, who was working in a factory on the waterfront, was the first to ring the emergency services.

‘There weren’t many phones on the go in the 1970s but I had the phone beside me in work and when I saw it happen, I gave the emergency services a call,’ he said. ‘As far as I am aware, I was the first one to do so.’

The Irish Air Corp pilot Jim Liddy of the SE.5A and all on board the Alouette were killed, including pilot Gilbert ‘Gilly’ Chomat, renowned cameraman Skeets Kelly and director Burch Williams.

Two of the main actors in the film were Michael York and Elke Sommer but neither were involved in the accident.

Vincent’s brother Stan also recalls the catastrophe.

‘I remember the shock and the horror,’ he said. ‘People down there were outside watching the filming for the day and they couldn’t believe what they were seeing.’

Tommy Dover of the Wicklow RNLI also has vivid memories of the crash, despite being very young at the time.

‘We were kids when it happened. There were about seven or eight planes and a helicopter with the crew so we went to the castle to watch the filming,’ he said. ‘I just remember the bang. It was my first time experiencing fear. Everyone started shouting to get the lifeboat.’

It is understood that the same aircraft had been used only several weeks previously during the filming of ‘The Blue Max’ and everything had run smoothly. Witnesses of the Zeppelin disaster believe that the two aircraft may have accidentally veered too close to one another.

Despite the accident, the film was completed and later released in 1971 under the director Etienne Perier.

(First published in the Wicklow People newspaper: print edition. Also available online at: http://www.independent.ie/regionals/wicklowpeople/news/wicklow-residents-recall-the-day-a-film-crew-met-their-fate-35046061.html)

Wexford group raise an incredible €191,118 for Nepal victims – New Ross Standard, July 16 2016

Eight Wexford trekkers escaped with their lives when they were caught up in the devastating Nepal earthquake last year and in an effort to give something back, they raised €191,118.72 for its victims.

Following several large fundraisers including a concert in the National Opera House and a Midsummer’s Night Ball in Whites, the group donated the money to Trócaire, who pumped it back in to rebuilding Kathmandu. They soon got people from across the county on board and according to one of the eight trekkers Joan Etchingham, it was their generosity and goodwill that made the fundraising initiative as successful as it was.

‘We were completely blown away by the generosity of individuals, groups and businesses in Wexford,’ she said. ‘Everyone was overwhelmed with the amount of support from everyone in Wexford. They did everything, from giving us a fiver to putting on an event to donating their money from birthday parties. We couldn’t have done a fraction of it without their support.’

Concerts, sponsored walks, cake sales, garden parties and church collections were just some of the events that took place over the course of almost three months.

‘It took on a life of its own,’ said Joan. ‘Everyone just went hell for leather when they were hearing about the earthquake on the news. It took us a while to realise how much we had raised and it was only when it all came together that we realised how much of a success it was.’

The eight Wexford trekkers caught up in the quake, which killed more than 8,500 people and made hundreds of thousands homeless, were: Catherine Jordan, Mary Moran, John Nolan, Jimmy Morrissey, Fr. Tom Dalton, Jim McGillicuddy, Ger Colfer and Joan Etchingham.

On witnessing the devastation that occurred all around them, from which they escaped unharmed, they decided they needed to help.

‘We experienced extreme kindness and help from local people in Nepal,’ said Joan. ‘We wanted to repay the kindness that they had shown us.’

The money that the group raised has gone towards building wells for clean water, supplying tents for shelter and providing food, among other things.

The eight trekkers are considering returning to Nepal next year to see first hand where all of the money from Wexford has gone.

‘We would obviously be paying for it ourselves. All of the money has gone to the charity,’ stressed Joan. ‘We would like to go back and see how things are going.’

(First published in the New Ross Standard newspaper: print edition. Also available online at: http://www.independent.ie/regionals/newrossstandard/news/wexford-group-raise-an-incredible-191118-for-nepal-victims-34875338.html)